What Will Change in Japan in 2022

As the Japanese fiscal year comes to an end, now is a good time to review some changes that will affect Japanese society in 2022.

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The Change of the Age of the Majority in Japan

The most important change in Japan this year is the change of the age of the majority for the first time in 140 years. Now set at 20 years old, it will change to 18 on the 1st of April (the start of the new fiscal year). Japanese people aged 18 and over will be able to make their own decisions, which means being allowed to sign contracts, make a passport on their own, and be able to vote. Will that change the results of the upcoming elections?

However, Japanese people will still have to wait to be 20 years old to be allowed to drink, smoke, gamble on horse races, etc.

Also note that until now, the legal age for Japanese people to get married was 18 years old for men and 16 years old for women, but from 2022, the legal age will be 18 for both genders.

Changes in Support for Infertility Treatments

The Japanese National Health Insurance is going to give more support to couples going through infertility treatment to combat the country’s low birth rate. Men of all ages and women under 43 at the start of their treatment will be covered, and the treatment will not only include legally married couples but also people under common-law marriage. The coverage will include in vitro fertilization and artificial insemination, which are very expensive procedures that were not covered by the health insurance until now.

Pet Microchipping

Humans will not be the only ones to be affected by changes in Japan this year.

If you own a dog or cat in Japan, know that microchipping your pet with your personal information will be compulsory from the 1st of June, so you may want to visit your local pet doctor!


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Born in France, I've been living in Japan since 2011. I'm curious about everything, and living in Japan has allowed me to expand my vision of the world through a broad range of new activities, experiences, and encounters. As a writer, what I love most is listening to people's personal stories and share them with our readers.

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