Growing Vegetables during Japanese Rainy Season

Here is the new episode of the Kokoro Media remote farming project which involves you readers! (You can find our previous episodes here.)

Last month, after receiving our readers’ voting results, Masamichi planted satoimo, edamame, and shiso. Are they growing okay despite the weather? How much do these Japanese vegetables grow in a one-month span? Watch the short video below!

The Growth of Kokoro Media’s Vegetables

News from the Farm

What else is happening in the neighboring parcels? First, here is some news about the basil and tomato plants from last time.

花が咲いている植物

中程度の精度で自動的に生成された説明

In just one month, they have gotten this big!

草の上にある数種類の野菜

低い精度で自動的に生成された説明

Some plants have already produced tomatoes. After a little more wait, they will be ready to eat!

Among the plants, Masamichi found a little surprise.

花が咲いている植物

自動的に生成された説明

This is red shiso, although Masamichi did not plant it here! It was grown from seeds that fell there last year. As you may know, crop rotation is very important in organic farming, so happy surprises like this happen.

However, bad surprises also happen on an organic farm.

草の上にある数種類の植物

低い精度で自動的に生成された説明

Several corn plants have been eaten by birds. Judging by the fact they did not leave a single grain, it must have been very good.

Stay tuned for more news from the farm! Meanwhile, do not hesitate to share your vegetable-growing experiences and to ask questions for Masamichi in the comments below!



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Amélie Geeraert

Born in France, I've been living in Japan since 2011. I'm curious about everything, and living in Japan has allowed me to expand my vision of the world through a broad range of new activities, experiences, and encounters. As a writer, what I love most is listening to people's personal stories and share them with our readers.

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